Shelf Control #22 & This Week in Books 10/04/19

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Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves created and hosted by Lisa @ Bookshelf Fantasies. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out Lisa’s introductory post, here.

24485976The Vanishing Witch
by Karen Maitland

Lincoln, 1380. A raven-haired widow is newly arrived in John of Gaunt’s city, with her two unnaturally beautiful children in tow.

The widow Catlin seems kind, helping wool merchant Robert of Bassingham care for his ill wife. Surely it makes sense for Catlin and her family to move into Robert’s home?

But when first Robert’s wife – and then others – start dying unnatural deaths, the whispers turn to witchcraft. The reign of Richard II brings bloody revolution, but does it also give shelter to the black arts?

And which is more deadly for the innocents of Lincoln?

I think I’ve mentioned on my blog before that I don’t tend to stray far outside of the Early Modern period when it comes to historical fiction, although it’s also inevitable to read a lot set during the Victorian era because it’s an era beloved by so many writers, but over the past couple of years I’ve started to become more and more interested in the Middle Ages and the Ancient world. Sadly, modern history just isn’t my jam, so I guess it should come as no surprise that my interests keep moving farther and farther back.

I actually own four of Karen Maitland’s novels, most of them I’ve found in charity shops, and yet I haven’t read a single one. Very risky, I know. The thing is her novels sound so good, but I never tend to gravitate towards them. The Vanishing Witch is one in particular that I’ve always gravitated towards because, of course, it involves witchcraft. Considering we usually think of the 17th century when we think of witch trials, I’m always intrigued by stories that include witchcraft in earlier periods of history. One day I will read this book and see if I enjoy Karen Maitland as much as I hope I will – it’s just so chunky!

Do you own multiple books by an author you haven’t read? Do you enjoy books set in the Middle Ages?

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This week I’m joining in with Lipsy @ Lipsyy Lost & Found to talk about the books I’ve been reading recently!

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Now

I’m still reading The Wicked King and The Calculating Stars, both of which I’d like to finish this week as well as Within the Sanctuary of Wings which I couldn’t resist picking up to finish off The Memoirs of Lady Trent series. I’m pretty gutted I’m coming to the end of this series, to be honest, but I’d much rather it have a good ending than be dragged out forever. I’m enjoying it so far!

Then

I finished the audiobook of In the Labyrinth of Drakes, which put me in the mood to dive straight into the next book, and I loved this one! This has definitely been my favourite book in the series so far; Isabella has really come into her own by this book, and I love that she’s finally starting to feel comfortable in her own skin.

Next

I love a novella, and the three I read last week have really put me in the mood for more. Of Sorrow and Such is one that’s been on my radar for a while – who am I to say no to a story about witches, after all? – and as we’re in the midst of the O.W.Ls Readathon I’m going to take advantage of novellas where I can!

What have you been reading recently?

3 thoughts on “Shelf Control #22 & This Week in Books 10/04/19

  1. Lisa says:

    I have a Karen Maitland book that I picked up at a library sale — it looked good at the time, but I’ve never been able to bring myself to get started. I hope you end up liking this one! It does sound good. I’m looking forward to reading Of Sorrow and Such too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Jess @ Jessticulates says:

      Good to know I’m not the only one! Thanks, I feel like I’ve been reading a lot of great books recently. 🙂

      Like

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